Cognitive social learning theory

History[ edit ] The conceptual roots for social cognitive theory come from Edwin B. Holt and Harold Chapman Brown 's book theorizing that all animal action is based on fulfilling the psychological needs of "feeling, emotion, and desire". The most notable component of this theory is that it predicted a person cannot learn to imitate until they are imitated.

Cognitive social learning theory

It developed into the SCT in and posits that learning occurs in a social context with a dynamic and reciprocal interaction of the person, environment, and behavior. The unique feature of SCT is the emphasis on social influence and its emphasis on external and internal social reinforcement.

SCT considers the unique way in which individuals acquire and maintain behavior, while also considering the social environment in which individuals perform the behavior.

Cognitive social learning theory

The theory takes into account a person's past experiences, which factor into whether behavioral action will occur. These past experiences influences reinforcements, expectations, and expectancies, all of which shape whether a person will engage in a specific behavior and the reasons why a person engages in that behavior.

Many theories of behavior used in health promotion do not consider maintenance of behavior, but rather focus on initiating behavior.

This is unfortunate as maintenance of behavior, and not just initiation of behavior, is the true goal in public health.

Cognitive social learning theory

The goal of SCT is to explain how people regulate their behavior through control and reinforcement to achieve goal-directed behavior that can be maintained over time.

The first five constructs were developed as part of the SLT; the construct of self-efficacy was added when the theory evolved into SCT.

This refers to the dynamic and reciprocal interaction of person individual with a set of learned experiencesenvironment external social contextand behavior responses to stimuli to achieve goals.

Behavioral Capability - This refers to a person's actual ability to perform a behavior through essential knowledge and skills.

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In order to successfully perform a behavior, a person must know what to do and how to do it. People learn from the consequences of their behavior, which also affects the environment in which they live. Observational Learning - This asserts that people can witness and observe a behavior conducted by others, and then reproduce those actions.

This is often exhibited through "modeling" of behaviors. If individuals see successful demonstration of a behavior, they can also complete the behavior successfully. Reinforcements - This refers to the internal or external responses to a person's behavior that affect the likelihood of continuing or discontinuing the behavior.

Reinforcements can be self-initiated or in the environment, and reinforcements can be positive or negative. This is the construct of SCT that most closely ties to the reciprocal relationship between behavior and environment.

Expectations - This refers to the anticipated consequences of a person's behavior. Outcome expectations can be health-related or not health-related. People anticipate the consequences of their actions before engaging in the behavior, and these anticipated consequences can influence successful completion of the behavior.

Expectations derive largely from previous experience. While expectancies also derive from previous experience, expectancies focus on the value that is placed on the outcome and are subjective to the individual. Self-efficacy - This refers to the level of a person's confidence in his or her ability to successfully perform a behavior.

Self-efficacy is unique to SCT although other theories have added this construct at later dates, such as the Theory of Planned Behavior.

Self-efficacy is influenced by a person's specific capabilities and other individual factors, as well as by environmental factors barriers and facilitators. Limitation of Social Cognitive Theory There are several limitations of SCT, which should be considered when using this theory in public health.

Limitations of the model include the following: The theory assumes that changes in the environment will automatically lead to changes in the person, when this may not always be true.Social learning theory combines cognitive learning theory (which posits that learning is influenced by psychological factors) and behavioral learning theory (which assumes that learning is based.

Because learning is so complex, there are many different psychological theories to explain how and why people learn. A psychologist named Albert Bandura proposed a social learning theory which suggests that observation, imitation, and modeling play a primary role in this process.

Social Learning Theory is a theory of learning and social behavior which proposes that new behaviors can be acquired by observing and imitating others. It states that learning is a cognitive process that takes place in a social context and can occur purely through observation or direct instruction, even in the absence of motor reproduction or direct reinforcement.

Social learning theory is not a full explanation for all behavior. This is particularly the case when there is no apparent role model in the person’s life to imitate for a given behavior.

Mediational Processes

The discovery of mirror neurons has lent biological support to the theory of social learning. Social learning theory is not a full explanation for all behavior. This is particularly the case when there is no apparent role model in the person’s life to imitate for a given behavior.

The discovery of mirror neurons has lent biological support to the theory of social learning. Social Learning Theory discusses the cognitive process that takes place in a social context which occurs after an individual is exposed to information through observation or direct instruction.

Social Learning Theory Bandura Social Learning Theory